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Colorado toll road to become more irrelevant.

According to today’s Denver Post, “E-470 officials raise toll rates starting January 1.”

In other words, “Even fewer drivers to use E-470 toll road in new year.”


Thankfully the PUC is there to save them from their folly. Whatever would we do without smart people in government? Without them, private individuals would spend private money to provide services that the market does not want. How silly of them!

Those private business people sure are stupid for wanting to invest their own money somewhere it is not needed. They should thank the PUC for saving them the trouble of failing.

Of course, there is another way to look at it. It is a quaint, old-fashioned and completely discredited idea called "supply and demand." It is supposed to work like this:

If a private person thinks he can provide a good or service to those that want it, he provides it. If enough people want it, he makes money. If not enough people want it, he goes out of business.

It is rather radical. Only crazy right wing nuts - you know, those ignorant "tea baggers" - profess to believe in such magic as a "free market."

The scariest part of this "supply and demand" concept is that it is supposed to work without any government oversight. Crazy! I know. Thankfully, the PUC is there to make sure such unbridled lawlessness does not take over our economy. The collective judgment of the PUC is far superior to the business judgment of cab owners.

Can you imagine if cabbies were just allowed to enter the market and compete without any government permission at all? The thought is horrifying. It would be complete anarchy.

Thankfully, we have central planning. Historically, central planning has worked very well. (After all, why would we still be using it if it had a history of failure?) Central planning is based on the premise that the free market is way too complicated to be left on its own, and that smart regulators in government need to decide how much of a good or service is needed to best serve the public. The Soviet Union did an excellent job of this when it came to deciding exactly how much bread to produce for its people.

It is pure coincidence, of course, that existing cab companies just happen to be opposed to further cabs on the street. After all, they only want what is best for the public. More cabs on the streets means more competition for them and less market share and less money. But that is beside the point.

Existing cab companies do not care about additional competition. They only care about the good of the collective, and they know central planning is the best way to make that determination.

Central planning lives!

David K. Williams, Jr.
Right here in Colorado, the state Public Utilities Commission is its own little politburo.
The PUC sits in judgment of how many taxis are needed in Denver. They study, they take testimony, they listen to arguments and they decide exactly the number of taxis needed to best serve the people of Denver.
Recently, they decided Denver has exactly the correct number of taxis and denied applications for an additional 300 taxi licenses.
PUC Commissioner James Tarpey explained the decision: “Cabs would rather be downtown no matter how long the lines (at taxi stands). The market has more than it can handle.” (See the Denver Post story “PUC denies taxi permits.“)
See, Mr. Tarpey and the rest of the PUC are only looking out for the best interest of the public. See, they are smart enough to tell potential cabbies that they will only fail if they invest their privately raised money. See, the ignorant cabbies are so stupid that they are willing to invest their own money – even though they are only going to fail. See, the ignorant cabbies’ private market research is inferior to the government’s superior knowledge.
Thankfully the PUC is there to save them from their folly. Whatever would we do without smart people in government? Without them, private individuals would spend private money to provide services that the market does not want. How silly of them!
Those private business people sure are stupid for wanting to invest their own money somewhere it is not needed. They should thank the PUC for saving them the trouble of failing.
Of course, there is another way to look at it. It is a quaint, old-fashioned and completely discredited idea called “supply and demand.” It is supposed to work like this:
If a private person thinks he can provide a good or service to those that want it, he provides it. If enough people want it, he makes money. If not enough people want it, he goes out of business.
It is rather radical. Only crazy right wing nuts – you know, those ignorant “tea baggers” – profess to believe in such magic as a “free market.”
The scariest part of this “supply and demand” concept is that it is supposed to work without any government oversight. Crazy! I know. Thankfully, the PUC is there to make sure such unbridled lawlessness does not take over our economy. The collective judgment of the PUC is far superior to the business judgment of cab owners.
Can you imagine if cabbies were just allowed to enter the market and compete without any government permission at all? The thought is horrifying. It would be complete anarchy.
Thankfully, we have central planning. Historically, central planning has worked very well. (After all, why would we still be using it if it had a history of failure?) Central planning is based on the premise that the free market is way too complicated to be left on its own, and that smart regulators in government need to decide how much of a good or service is needed to best serve the public. The Soviet Union did an excellent job of this when it came to deciding exactly how much bread to produce for its people.
It is pure coincidence, of course, that existing cab companies just happen to be opposed to further cabs on the street. After all, they only want what is best for the public. More cabs on the streets means more competition for them and less market share and less money. But that is beside the point.
Existing cab companies do not care about additional competition. They only care about the good of the collective, and they know central planning is the best way to make that determination.