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See "Colo. lawmakers urged to ban 'spice'")

She wrote:

Also, a handful of people testified that the ban is unnecessary.

David K. Williams Jr., a Denver lawyer, said a state ban would be like banning table salt or fatty foods in restaurants. Asked about whether a ban wouldn't help discourage Spice use among youths, Williams scoffed.

"It's my responsibility to teach my daughter to make good decisions, not the government's," Williams said.

This was my response to the editor regarding the story:

Dear editor:

Kristen Wyatt's characterization of my response to Senator King's question is completely inaccurate.

I didn't scoff at all. I agreed with Senator King that [the synthetic cabbinoids] should be banned for minors, just like cigarettes and alcohol. The implication that I was anything less than respectful before the committee is offensive and inaccurate.

My entire point was that prohibition does not work and never has. I did not compare salt and fat foods to synthetic cannabinoids, I said that banning of things for "own good," like salt, is nannyism and is not the role of government.

It is no wonder paper copies of news are harder and harder to find.

For the record, I get along very well with the bill's sponsor, Senator Mike Kopp. We just happen to disagree on this particular piece of legislation. The Gadsden Society and I are working in favor of the "Healthcare Opportunity & Patient Empowerment Act" he is sponsoring. This bill would allow Colorado to join an interstate compact with at least one other state and opt out of Obamacare.

Kristen Wyatt and the Denver Post get me wrong.

Kristen Wyatt’s story in today’s Denver Post severely mischaracterizes my testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee yesterday. (See “Colo. lawmakers urged to ban ‘spice’)

She wrote:
Also, a handful of people testified that the ban is unnecessary.
David K. Williams Jr., a Denver lawyer, said a state ban would be like banning table salt or fatty foods in restaurants. Asked about whether a ban wouldn’t help discourage Spice use among youths, Williams scoffed.
“It’s my responsibility to teach my daughter to make good decisions, not the government’s,” Williams said.
This was my response to the editor regarding the story:
Dear editor:
Kristen Wyatt’s characterization of my response to Senator King’s question is completely inaccurate.
I didn’t scoff at all. I agreed with Senator King that [the synthetic cabbinoids] should be banned for minors, just like cigarettes and alcohol. The implication that I was anything less than respectful before the committee is offensive and inaccurate.
My entire point was that prohibition does not work and never has. I did not compare salt and fat foods to synthetic cannabinoids, I said that banning of things for “own good,” like salt, is nannyism and is not the role of government.
It is no wonder paper copies of news are harder and harder to find.
For the record, I get along very well with the bill’s sponsor, Senator Mike Kopp. We just happen to disagree on this particular piece of legislation. The Gadsden Society and I are working in favor of the “Healthcare Opportunity & Patient Empowerment Act” he is sponsoring. This bill would allow Colorado to join an interstate compact with at least one other state and opt out of Obamacare.